Dynamic Groups in SSRS Reports with MDX

Providing a dynamic group in SSRS with SQL is not all that hard. It is also a common business requirement when combining reports. In example, I see very often an old system providing multiple similar reports to its users – that is reports with exactly the same layout but with different items on rows or columns. I also see quite often SSRS requirements asking me to mock the old functionality and build multiple almost identical reports. My personal preference is to combine them in one if possible, thus reducing the maintenance and even development effort and cost. In SQL we have the convenience to choose how to name the output columns. As long as we have a stable dataset – that is a constant number of columns with the same data types called the same way, SSRS does not differentiate between them and treats them the same way. This allows us to flexibly change their actual contents. The standard approach in MDX would be to create all possible “groups” in a large dataset and then use one or another in the report as required through expressions. This, however, leads to slower execution times, larger chunks of data going around the network and the need to aggregate within SSRS at almost every data cell.

Instead, we can build the same functionality by constructing MDX dynamically through the use of parameters. Let’s examine a practical case to illustrate the concept a bit more clearly. If we assume that the Adventure Works executives asked me to create two simple reports showing years across the columns, their Internet Sales Amount in the data area and on one of them product categories on rows, while on the other one – the countries from which the sales originate from. The layout would be the same – a tablix, which has one column group – Year (calendar), Internet Sales Amount in the data cell and one of the two dimension hierarchies (Product Category or Country) on rows. The MDX for the datasets would also be fairly similar:

Year

Country

As we can see, the only difference here is the set on rows. Instead of providing two reports we can combine them in one. The standard approach I see all developers implementing is crossjoining all sets together and then aggregating in SSRS. To switch between the two grouping fields there would be a parameter “Group By”. The sample MDX for this report would be:

And the layout in SSRS:

The row group (and the expression within the row cells) here is based on a GroupBy parameter with two values – “product” or “country”. In SSRS the expression for them looks like this:


When the user selects Product as a value for the Group By parameter, our report renders grouped with the Product categories on rows. In this particular case the dataset is relatively small even when we do a full crossjoin between years, product categories and countries. However, in many cases the number of items on rows can be prohibitive. Therefore, it is better if we can avoid doing this by dynamically constructing the MDX expression. We can add another (Internal) parameter – GroupMDX to our report with the following expression as its default value:

Then, we can replace the report dataset with the following MDX:

To make it execute, I added as a sample query parameter GroupMDX with a value of [Product].[Product Categories].[Category]*[Customer].[Customer Geography].[Australia]. Note that you should use the same hierarchies as sample parameters as what you are actually using in your MDX parameter – otherwise you will get empty results (e.g. if I were to use [Customer].[Country].[Australia] as a sample in this case the actual dataset would not be able to figure out that the hierarchy has been changed and will return an empty set on rows for country).

Unlike with SQL, though, we have a problem – every time the query executes with a different set as a parameter value it returns different result set and its fields collection does not link well to them:

Luckily, there is a workaround. We can add a bit of custom code to our report (Report Properties -> Code). For more details you can read the following MSDN article. In a nutshell, we can check in the custom code for missing fields, thus guarding against the error we are receiving. The slightly modified code snippet from the MSDN page is:

Now, we can wrap every possibly disappearing fields reference within our report with a call to the function. In our case, we can replace the row group expression, as well as the row cell expression with the following expression:

Now we can run our report and get the results we expect. Every time we change the Group By parameter and run the report, SSRS constructs a different MDX query and sends it to SSAS getting only the results it needs. It is a fiddly technique, but in many cases can be a lifesaver – in particular when the large crossjoin method is just too slow.

And the report rdl can be downloaded here: [listyofiles folder=”wp-content/DynamicGroups”]

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One thought on “Dynamic Groups in SSRS Reports with MDX”

  1. Hi Boyan,

    Have used the same method as you described, but with the little twist …

    added a measure called GroupByValue

    MEMBER [GroupByValue] AS STRTOVALUE(@GroupBy + “.Currentmember.Member_Caption”)

    Thereby avoiding the use of custom code and expressions in the grouping.

    /Erik

    Like

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